History Archives - The Caulfield Grammarians' Association

History

Labora: Always illuminating and never boring!

Our school magazine, Labora, showcases so much that is special about the spirit and achievements of our school community. In a school committed both to valuing our heritage and inspiring our future, Labora reflects connection and engagement. Labora magazine has informed our School and alumni community since March 1957. It began as a four-page newsletter of the Caulfield Grammarians’ Association, developed by then President, Russ Mathews (1926-29). It was modelled on the successful monthly bulletins written by staff member, Hugh Gemmell Lamb-Smith (1913-15). In his first editorial Russ outlined his desire for ‘La Bora’ to “provide a galaxy of news on old boys, notes on coming events, post mortems on past ones, and news of the School”. He recruited an enthusiastic editorial team of Alan Hick...

Our Seven Vorraths

Quite a few families have had two, three or more members at Caulfield Grammar School; but seven is a rarity. One of those is the Vorrath family whose first members arrived in the 1920s. Aside from being a good student, Carl Vorrath (1928) was a fine tennis player. After leaving school he studied automotive engineering, becoming a leading metallurgist with expertise in the development of aluminium. In 1956, he founded his own aluminium casting firm and was a part-time lecturer in metallurgy at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. Carl supported the school for the rest of his life, becoming an early member of the Foundation and attending many reunions. Travis Vorrath (known as Bill) (1929) and was one of those boys who excelled at everything. By the time he left school, he ...

A Night of Firsts

A box of papers was recently delivered to the Archives Centre. There was one small item of particular interest which marked a very important event in the history of Caulfield Grammar School. It was a menu card for the Caulfield Grammarians’ Association dinner, held at the Esplanade Hotel in St Kilda on Thursday 30th April, 1931. This was a particularly significant dinner because it was the first held after the school became a company just ten days earlier. One of the first members of the School Council, Mr Richard Ballard, was present. Mr Frank Archer, soon to be the first Headmaster to operate under the newly formed Council, was there along with Mr Walter Buntine, the Principal. Also, in attendance was Dr J.C.V. Behan (1894-95), Victoria’s first Rhodes Scholar, and a member of the School ...

Looking back to the 1998 Seniors Premiership

Following on from the disappointing 1997 season that culminated in relegation from D to E Grade, considerable effort went into correcting a number of deficiencies within the club. The aim was to not only return to D Section but to achieve the ultimate prize, a senior premiership. It had been 15 years since the club won the 1983 C Section Senior Flag. Although there were some finals’ appearances in the interim, ultimate success had not been achieved and the reserves’ teams had been consistently unsuccessful. This ‘down’ period had been punctuated by the U19 Section 3 premiership in 1990 but any impetus emanating from that team had not been realised. A promise made by Hawthorn premiership player and former Caulfield Grammar School Football Captain, Dean Anderson, to one day play in a team wi...

Lone jogger – Dr Jack Cherny

Grammarians who were students at Caulfield Campus in the last years of the 20thCentury and the early years of the 21st will remember a lone figure of Dr Jack Cherny jogging around the Alf Mills Oval on most mornings of the year. It is calculated that he chalked up some 82,000 laps covering 45,990 kilometres over 32 years from 1975 to 2007. Jack arrived at Caulfield Grammar School from Ripponlea State School in 1942 and became a member of Barnett House. A self-confessed “swot”, he maintained good results but his other aim was to obtain House Colours which he achieved in swimming, tennis and debating. In 1945, he took part in the E1 Players production of Twelfth Night which was staged before an audience of 400 at the Malvern Town Hall. In 1949, he was appointed a School Officer and took the ...

A Mysterious Suitcase

A couple of years ago, a water pipe burst in the roof of Morcom House causing damage to the ceiling. On the face of it, this was a fairly straightforward job of plumbing and plastering…but it uncovered a mystery. Found in the roof was a suitcase. Aside from being rather dirty and with corroded metalwork, it was a high quality case in reasonably good condition. It was also empty save for a piece of red ribbon fastened with drawing pins to the inside of the lid in the shape of the Star of David. On the outside of the lid was the name BICKERTON in black letters about five centimeters in height. In 1919, a young lad, Hugh Geoffrey Bickerton, was enrolled on his sixth birthday at Caulfield Grammar School to start the following year. He had been born in Brisbane at Eagle Junction on 12 Sep...

A Medical Start for the Irwin Family

Following the article about the Pyman family in the December 2017 edition of Labora, Keith Irwin(1949-55) provided the following information about the five generations of his family who have attended the School: In 1882 Dr Anderson Irwin, who had emigrated from Ireland, established his medical practice in Glen Eira Road opposite where the town hall now stands. His residence named Rose Hill was also on the nine-acre property bounded by Glen Eira and Hawthorn Roads. Some years later the land was sub-divided and Rose Hill Avenue came into being. His appointments included Medical Officer and Public Vaccinator for the shire. No doubt a fair proportion of the CGS students of that era would have been his patients. His two sons attended Caulfield – Frederick (1898-99), who died in the First World ...