Captain at Gallipoli – Andrew Percival Rowan

History

Captain at Gallipoli – Andrew Percival Rowan

Andrew Percival Rowan was born at St Kilda on 31st of March 1876 and was one of the seven sons and three daughters of Andrew and Margaret Rowan of Brighton Road, Elsternwick entered the school in 1889 as a thirteen-year-old day scholar and remained for some years. It appears that he also attended Queen’s College, St Kilda, (founded in 1878), as the following newspaper report in a Melbourne newspaper of 1902 outlined. (Photo of the Warriors’ Trophy). ‘The above is from a photograph of the ‘Warriors Trophy’, presented to the Queen’s College, St Kilda by seven old boys who are fighting for King and Empire in South Africa. There are some twenty-five old Queen’s boys to the front in the Boer war and seven of them – some of whom have left school over twelve years ago – happened to meet at Dundee...

Cadet Drill Instructor – Ernest Norman Coffey

Ernest Norman Coffey had a special connection with Caulfield Grammar School as he was named in the CGS Speech Night program for 1900 in an article which read in part; OLD BOYS AT THE WAR Several members of the School Cadet Corps of past years took active part in the recent war, where they appear to have displayed the courage and gallantry of veterans. With the First Victorian Contingent there were Private Tom Stock and the School Drill Instructor, Sergeant Major Coffey.[1] Coffey had been born in New Zealand in 1862 to Johan and Mary Coffey and later migrated to Australia where he married Louise Youlden in November 1885 and fathered four children between 1886 and 1898. He had served as a Sergeant with the 2nd Battalion Infantry Brigade in the Victorian Forces where this unit won the Brasse...

40th Anniversary Co-Education & Wheelers Hill Campus

School history was made on February 4, 1981 when classes began at the new co-educational campus in our centenary year. 197 boys and girls from Year 3-7 and 10 staff gathered with founding Head of Campus, Milton Cujes (1981-89) at the new campus situated on 20 hectares of sloping scenic land at the foot of the Dandenong Ranges. On the first day in a whole-campus assembly an overview of school history was shared and Headmaster, Rev A Holmes (1977-92) led the singing of the School Song. Scripture readings from Proverbs and Psalms reminded all present of the legacy from School Founder, Joseph Henry Davies, M.A. (1881-88) that, “the School be a thoroughly Christian one”. Read more about the this special day and co-education on the Caulfield Grammar School website.

Known by Blue and White

Nothing denotes ‘belonging’ as much as wearing the uniform of a school. Not only is our Caulfield Grammar School uniform a known emblem with visibility, but the familiar colours and styling symbolise tradition and membership. As our School launches a new transseasonal uniform range it’s a unique opportunity to consider the evolution of student attire. It’s believed that school uniforms date from the 16th century in England at Christ Church School in 1552, when students were given a long blue coat and yellow, knee-high socks. Our distinctive colours of blue and white and motto, ‘Labora ut Requiescas’ were chosen in 1882 by School Founder, Joseph Henry Davies (1881-88). Such was the pride for the ‘blue and white’ that the original School Song of 1919, written by teacher Arthur Lormer (1920-5...

A skeleton school

Malvern Grammar and the paralysis epidemic of 1937 The outbreak of an infantile paralysis epidemic in 1937-39 was particularly severe in Melbourne, causing the closure of schools and the banning of children from public transport. Pleasingly, both editions of the Malvern Grammar School magazine, The Malvern Grammarian, reported on the 1937 school year with a profound thankfulness that the epidemic had claimed no one in the School. School Captain John Grover Emery (1930-37) reported that “Owing to absences, we were a skeleton school towards the end of second term but very soon in the third term, we became except in the very youngest classes, nearly a full school again.” Correspondence work was a great help to absent students. The production of The Importance of Being Earnest, was abandoned o...

Premier of Victoria – Lindsay Thompson

Alumni background Lindsay Hamilton Simpson Thompson was born on 15th October 1923. His father, who had served in the First World War, died in 1926 and soon after Lindsay, his mother and elderly grandmother moved from Glen Iris to Elsternwick to live with his mother’s married sister (Effie Seward) and her family. Lindsay was enrolled at Caulfield Grammar School during 1929. In his autobiography (I Remember) he recalled that on his first day he was shown around the playground by two boys who were also to make their mark in the world. One was Peter Karmel, School Captain in 1939, who later served with distinction as Chair of the Commonwealth Tertiary Education Commission and as Vice Chancellor of both Flinders University and the Australian National University. The other was Stan Kurrle, who w...

Pandemic pondering – A year of firsts

Pondering is the act of weighing something up in the mind. It can be defined as reflecting on the events of the day, thinking or considering, especially quietly, soberly, and deeply. 2020 is a year that will be long remembered. While the Coronavirus pandemic has upturned our year, the unexpected challenges have brought forth new learnings and innovation by our students, staff and School community. Many staff and students have actively embraced their lockdown journey, focusing time and energy on what matters and not on things that are out of their control. Living the School values and staying in touch by phoning friends, writing reflections, making video messages and collecting memorabilia as a ‘memory keeper’ for the School Archive collection. It has been a year of many firsts – not only a...

Friendship Flag – William Abbott

FLAG RETURNED TO SOLDIERS FAMILY AFTER 75 YEARS. “It might have been a flag to us but you sent his spirit home” Masako Sakamoto Sometime late in World War II an Australian soldier, Ashie Garrard from the small Riverina town of Berrigan captured a Japanese Friendship flag in Borneo and sent it home to the children of a family friend as a souvenir. A Friendship Flag was a Japanese Flag signed by the soldiers family and neighbours as a token of good luck prior to the embarkation of the soldier to war. The name of the soldier was Shinji Takeda. The children who received the flag were the three Abbott brothers and their sister who were the children of then local solicitor in Berrigan. For many years the friendship flag has been in the possession of William Abbott who tried to find a...

Military Historian – Daryl Moran

Daryl Moran came to Caulfield Grammar School as a student in 1966. A foundation member of Kurrle House, he gained the Higher Schools’ Certificate (HSC) in 1970. He was a School Committee member (1970), member of the first eighteen football team (1970), an RSM in the Cadet Unit (1969), a member of the School Choir and involved in drama productions. Daryl is in the back row, third from right. After leaving school, Daryl completed teacher training at Mercer House and taught in the primary school at Peninsula Grammar. He was then appointed one of the foundation members of the teaching staff at Caulfield’s Wheelers Hill Campus, taking the Year 4 class when the campus opened in 1981. He was involved in all aspects of the development of the campus, including being a foundation member of Wilsmore ...

Stay home and stay safe

The 1919 Epidemic and the 1937 Polio outbreak “In every way the health of the boys in 1918, both in the day school and in the Houses, has been wonderfully good – no epidemics have overtaken us and even colds have not been common.” – Walter M Buntine, 38th Annual Speech Night, 1918. The sudden arrival of COVID-19 has dramatically changed the 2020 school year and daily lives. Yet since foundation in 1881 our School has faced unexpected times of disruption due to a health crisis or world war and, each time, has optimistically faced these trials, drawing on the strength of our community and goodwill of staff, students, and School Council. As Principal Ashleigh Martin has written to our school community, “the heart and soul of our School is the ‘people’.” When Spanish influenza swept into...

The Four Minute Mile – John Landy

Today (6 May) marks the 66th anniversary of what many consider to be the greatest day in athletics history. On 6 May 1954, running at the Ifley Road track in Oxford, Roger Bannister, paced by his friends Chris Chataway and Chris Brasher, became the first man to run the mile in under four minutes. His time was 3.59.4. Forty-six days later, running at an international meeting in Turku, Finland, the Australian John Landy (Class of 1948) broke Bannister’s record with a time of 3.57.9. This remained the world record until July 1957. Landy and Bannister met later in 1954 at the British Empire Games in Vancouver, Canada, in what was dubbed “The Mile of the Century”. In this race both broke four minutes for the mile – Bannister winning after trailing for most of the race. Bannister retired from at...

The Light Horse – Charles Reginald Handfield

Charles Reginald Handfield was born in South Yarra on 26th August 1878 and was the youngest son of six children of Frederick and Mary Handfield. His father Lieutenant Frederick Oliver Handfield served in the Victorian Volunteer Navy from 1861-1870. The exact years Charles was at Malvern Grammar School are uncertain, but he was certainly a student during the years of 1895 – 96 as he was named Captain of the football and cricket teams as well as the School Champion. In 1896, when he was aged 18, there were 73 boys on the roll at MGS and it was evidently a notable year in the School’s history as in addition to success in study, there was also good success in sport. The football team won all its matches as did the First Eleven which notably had a draw with the Second XI of Scotch College...